June 26, 2022

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A used car shop in Ellenville, New York, caught fire in May 2019 and neighbors claimed it destroyed their homes

HBO and Mark Ruffalo are sued over the 2019 fire on set

HBO and Mark Ruffalo are sued over a 2019 fire on the set of upstate New York because I know this very much is true: Neighbors say production turned local car dealerships into a ‘powder keg’ that destroyed their home and exposed them to toxins

  • Agent exploded near Poughkeepsie in May 2019 when the HBO series starring Ruffalo was filming
  • Neighbors are now suing, claiming that production is responsible for the explosion
  • They say HBO turned the site into a “powder keg” by storing flammable materials at the agency
  • As a result, they say the fire got worse and destroyed their homes
  • They also claim that they were exposed to toxins and carcinogens and that they are still traumatized
  • Ruffalo and HBO are being sued over an unspecified number of millions of dollars

Mark Ruffalo and HBO have been sued over a 2019 fire at a filming location in the upstate for the mini-series I Know This Much Is True, claiming that they turned an area car dealership into a powder keg with filming equipment that exploded and destroyed their homes.

The lawsuit was first reported by TMZ Sunday.

People who lived next door to the agency in Ellenville, near Buckkeepsie, say the fire not only destroyed their homes, but also exposed them to harmful toxins and carcinogens.

They are now seeking an unspecified settlement from Ruffalo and the network, which TMZ says is in the millions.

Mark Ruffalo on HBO I Know That's Just Right

Mark Ruffalo on HBO I Know That’s Just Right

Neither Ruffalo nor HBO have commented.

Production had been using used car dealerships for their small build for a month before it caught fire in May 2019.

Ruffalo starred in the series alongside Rosie O’Donnell, but it’s unclear if she is a defendant in the lawsuit.

According to neighbors, production was to blame for the fire as it turned the agent into a “powder barrel” by storing kerosene, heating oil and other flammable materials on site.

It’s been three years since the fire, but the neighbors claim it hasn’t been cleaned up yet.

In the lawsuit they filed, they described it as an “open and relentless pile of debris, a toxin spill” that exposed them to Wind dust and gaseous dispersal.

The owners of the agency previously sued Calling Grace Productions, the production company behind the series, over the fire.

It is not clear what was the outcome of that lawsuit, or whether there was a cause for the fire.